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Umgang Krumbach

Umgang Krumbach

Umgang - Village Krumbach

Krumbach is known for its moorland which provides the people here with fruit and herbs as well as meadowland for old breeds of domestic animals which they have begun to breed again.

In one hotel, the special properties of the peaty soil is used for health and wellness purposes. The village also has its own special method of decision-making. In various committees, all the inhabitants of Krumbach can vote on the development of their village. This results in internationally recognised projects such as “BUS:STOP” comprising bus shelters by architects from the four corners of the world, regional improvements such as “Krumbach shines without chemicals” and “Young Forest” as well as programmes for locals and guests alike offered as part of the “Krumbach moors” initiative.

1. Gasthof Adler

1. Gasthof Adler

Traditionally, most public houses and inns were connected to a farm. This is also true of the Gasthof “Adler”, which is currently being run by the sixth generation of the same family. In the past the inn and, in particular, its kitchen, were supplied with produce from its own farm. The Adler loyally continues in this tradition. Rare breeds of domestic animals such as Duroc pigs, Dexter cattle and Merino lambs are therefore bred here. The kitchen also uses seasonal fruit from the region as well as wild herbs from the moor and the establishment’s own garden to make delicacies such as “Moorkräuterbrand” schnapps and ham from the Duroc pigs bred on the moorland.

2. Restaurant Schulhus

Gabi Strahammer in the Schulhus is known as an “exceptional chef”, as the Vorarlberg author Kurt Bracharz writes: “I noticed that everything was perfect. And when I say everything, I mean everything. Where and when did I last get this impression? I really cannot remember. Some minor point always spoils it. After all, nobody is perfect. Except, perhaps, Gabi Strahammer.” Here are the ingredients for her moor soft drink straight from Krumbach moor: meadow sweet, moor berries, cranberries, elder blossoms, elderberries, woodruff, lady’s bedstraw, fir shoots and wild thyme.

2. Restaurant Schulhus
3. Bus stop

3. Bus stop

Public transport is very important in Krumbach. The large roof of the bus shelter in the centre of the village testifies to this. It is the focal point of an architectural project which goes by the name of BUS:STOP. International architects were invited to design architectural sculptures in place of the usual bus shelters. Dietmar Steiner, director of the Architekturzentrum Wien, selected seven architects from all over the world. Local architects and craftspeople turned the designs into reality.

Architects: Hermann Kaufmann, Bernardo Bader & Rene Bechter

4. House of Generations

It is mainly two sections of the population which need new types of accommodation: singles, either old, or young and just leaving home. The accommodation needs to comply with their needs – especially with their desire for social contacts and corresponding facilities. Such accommodation needs to be close to social service providers, shops and public amenities. The flat needs to be affordable, barrier-free, robust and well designed. Krumbach is complying with these wishes in the form the “Generationenhaus”, which is a mixture of bedsits through to three-bedroom apartments, either occupant-owned or rented property. It also houses a doctor’s surgery, offices, community and meeting rooms.

Architect: Hermann Kaufmann

4. House of Generations
5. Residential complex

5. Residential complex

The detached house as a “sacred cow” is facing increased criticism: land use, increasing building costs, little adaptability to other ways of life for young and old are the arguments being voiced. Other forms of accommodation need to be enabled in the village. Such as high-rises, rented property and assisted-living models. Naturally, they should fit in with the appearance of the village. The example of old farmhouses makes this easier: a large house made from wood, a roof with a straight ridge and a new shape of the utility space. Such elements enable the construction of contemporary buildings that fit in with the character of the village, as demonstrated by this example.

Architect: Hermann Kaufmann

6. Haus B.

Like the construction of the new church, this former farmhouse bears witness to the economic heyday of the village at the start of the 19th century. As in neighbouring Allgäu, land consolidation increased crop yields, with the houses being moved from the village to the fields. This building is a typical Vorderwald “Mittelflurhaus” – with its accentuated symmetrical gable end and decorative elements, it represented the classicist zeitgeist. The renovation, between 2008 and 2010, ensured the continued survival of the residential part. Many parts of the building were renewed true to the original. The threshing floor and the barn, on the other hand, were extended: with staircase, large living room, granny flat and patio.

6. Haus B.
Umgang Infomedien © Adolf Bereuter / Bregenzerwald Tourismus

Book & Folder

Details of the objects are described in an accompanying folder. Furthermore, a book on the subject containing the background histories to the way of life in the Bregenzerwald is available. The information media are available from any one of the tourist information offices and from Bregenzerwald Tourismus.

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